How to Use Amazon Categories to Increase your Rankings

Nicholas C. Rossis

I have mentioned the importance of Amazon Categories as far as rankings are concerned in my post, I Just Published my Book. Now What?

Here is a rough guide to how many copies a book needs to sell to reach a certain rank in Amazon US, courtesy of Jackie Weger.

Amazon US rankings | From the blog of Nicholas C. Rossis, author of science fiction, the Pearseus epic fantasy series and children's books

This daunting figure, however, is only true when one thinks of the major categories – eg. “Books > Literature & Fiction.” The further one goes down the various subcategories, the easier it is to reach #1 in that sublisting.

I recently came across a great post on the subject by Jen Bresnick, so I thought I’d revisit this topic with a detailed how-to.

What is my Category?

When you look up a listing for a book on Amazon, scroll down past the reviews to the section titled “Look for similar items by category”.  If you visit the page…

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How to Use Amazon Categories to Increase your Rankings (Update)

Nicholas C. Rossis

Back in 2016, I had written a post with information on How to Use Amazon Categories to Increase your Rankings. It included an estimate of how many copies a book needs to sell to reach a certain rank on Amazon US. This has now been updated as follows:

Amazon sales to reach #1 | From the blog of Nicholas C. Rossis, author of science fiction, the Pearseus epic fantasy series and children's books Image found on KBoards

The rest of the information on my post, however, is still very much applicable–and all-important–today. I’m copying it here so you don’t have to go back-and-forth. As a reminder, the original post was based on a great post on the subject by Jen Bresnick.

What is my Category?

When you look up a listing for a book on Amazon, scroll down past the reviews to the section titled “Look for similar items by category”.  If you visit the page for Jen’s The Last Death of Tev Chrisini, for example, you’ll see this:

Amazon categories | From the blog of Nicholas C. Rossis, author of science fiction, the Pearseus epic fantasy series and children's books

Image: Jen Bresnick

The book…

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Ubersuggest: An Awesome Free Keyword Tool

Nicholas C. Rossis

Ubersuggest | From the blog of Nicholas C. Rossis, author of science fiction, the Pearseus epic fantasy series and children's bookYou may remember my review of Dave Chesson’s (aka Kindlepreneur’s) KDP Rocket. KDP Rocket is by far the easiest way to find keywords for your Amazon ads, as it searches for books similar to yours (in the Also Bought department) and offers these in a handy Excel spreadsheet.

I have now discovered the perfect companion to KDP Rocket: Ubersuggest. As the name, well, suggests (Ueber being German for over or hyper), Ubersuggest is a free keyword tool that comes up with more keywords than you can shake your virtual, SEO-supercharged stick at. You can then use these keywords for your Amazon ads, your Google ads, etc.

Even better, Ubersuggest allows you to choose whether you’re focusing on images, web, or shopping (hint: you want shopping).

How To Use It

Say you want to create an Amazon Marketing Services (AMS) campaign for your children’ book. You’ve already used KDP…

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“ing’ Words Revisited

Writing your first novel-Things you should know

gerund_onlyA while back, I revised my novel and noticed something that should have leaped off the page during past reviews, but didn’t. I was having a love affair with ‘ing’. These ‘ing’ words were all over the place.

I stopped the revision process and did some research on ‘ing’. I remembered reading somewhere, that the overuse of ‘ing’ words was not a good thing.

Opportunities to overuse the ‘ing’ word are boundless. There are nouns, adjectives, verbs, and even verbs masquerading as nouns called gerunds, all ending in ‘ing’.

So what’s the big deal? What’s wrong with ‘ing’ words?

The overuse of ‘ing’ words mark you as an amateur – Don’t be alarmed if you see more than a handful on one page. Do take a closer look if you see more than a handful in a single paragraph.

While wrapping a soothing sling around the fledgling’s broken wing, Diana was humming, dreaming of her prince…

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